What is the style of your remodeling project?

What is the style of your Remodeling Project?

Learn the key architectural and decor features to look for when starting building a new house, remodeling or updating the look of your house.

Picking a style for the photos in your portfolio can be tough, especially when your design includes a mixture of several styles. But deciding upon the right style is key; after all, categorizing your photos correctly ensures that users will find your project while searching for the style they love, instead of missing it because it’s in a category where it doesn’t belong.


Mediterranean. Mediterranean actually encompasses a wide variety of styles, including Moroccan, Tuscan, Spanish and Italian villa. They all have similar characteristics and emphasize warm earth tones and clay, stucco and tile.

Look for: Clay tile roofs, stucco exteriors, terra-cotta tile floors, colorful hand-painted tiles, iron railings, wood-beamed ceilings, elegant furnishings and arched windows or doors


Beach. Beach or coastal homes can either be on the ocean or have a beachy vibe through decor alone. This style can include everything from classic Cape Cod homes to rooms with themed nautical decor.

Look for: Sailboat, fish and surf decor; wood-shingle siding; boardwalks; docks; crisp whites; light blues or greens; distressed or whitewashed wood; and rope accents


Contemporary. Contemporary homes are the opposite of classic — they are bold and trendy and emphasize popular design. Rooms can have bold colors and mix-and-match textures; kitchens can be sleek and dramatic, with high-gloss cabinets and frosted glass.

Look for: Bright and contrasting colors, unique furniture shapes, dramatic architectural details and trendy materials or styles, such as chevron patterns, chalkboard paint and plastic


Craftsman. Craftsman homes are defined primarily by their time period — the 1900s through the 1930s. This style includes bungalows, Prairie homes and Arts and Crafts homes; they often are distinguishable by the home’s structure and architectural details instead of the interior design.

Look for: Low, pitched gable or hipped roofs; tapered and squared entry columns; custom built-ins; and oak woodwork


Farmhouse. Farmhouse homes can either be in a rural, farm-like setting or merely mimic farmhouse decor. This style includes traditional farmhouses with silos, barns and pastures, as well as small country-style details like rocking chairs and apron-front sinks.

Look for: Traditional country-style homes with front porches, picket fences and simple, unfussy design, as well as antique furniture, butcher block counters and rooster decor


Midcentury. Midcentury homes were considered modern in the 1950s and 1960s. This style includes Eichler ranches, split-level homes and midcentury modern decor.

Look for: Long and low rooflines, retro design, iconic furniture, pop art and geometric shapes


Modern. True modern homes are not trendy — basic materials and an ordered structure are used to create a clean, simple environment. This style includes minimalist and Bauhaus spaces, as well as grid-like glass houses.

Look for: A lack of trendy finishes; use of glass, steel and stone; straight lines; and minimal texture


Traditional. Traditional homes have familiar, classic details, materials and colors. This category includes many styles, such as Tudor, Victorian and colonial.

Look for: Conservative color palettes, rich wood tones, crown molding, crystal chandeliers and classic prints, such as florals, plaids and stripes


Transitional. Transitional homes fall between traditional and contemporary — they are often traditional homes that are evolving toward an updated, trendier look. Spaces done in this style include ones with popular finishes, colors and materials, but they aren’t quite as bold as contemporary homes.

Look for: Neutral colors (especially gray), minimal ornamentation, simple lines and small, trendy details, such as nailhead finishes, that update an elegant, traditional space


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